What The PE All American Game Offers European recruits!

Kids in europe need to learn how to compete! Practice, work and play against the best of the best. This is an unique way to increase the level of Football in Europe. This is the real deal. These kids will go after you and hit you. You can compare yourself with the best of the best. Like I received D1 offers without even playing this game imagine what will happen if these kids get tape playing against these US kids! Things are going to change major! Europe to D1 real quick!

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Become a Next Level DB

Defensive backs have to be sharp and versatile on the field. To enable them to move effectively in any direction, their training needs to address several components—strength, power, speed, speed endurance, reactive ability, flexibility and coordination. Addressing the specific demands of the position and training them in a logical manner will help any athlete willing to put in the necessary work. If your goal is to compete at the next level, your training program must be solid.

Below are two sample workout for D-backs. Try them out or add them to your routine to enhance your training. They both emphasize strength, so pick weights that challenge you beyond 5 reps. Complete the workout by performing each of the grouped exercises in circuit fashion (B1, B2, B3) before moving onto the next grouping (C1, C2, C3).

DB Workout One

A1. Power Clean: 3×5

B1. Back Squat: 4×5

  • Take the barbell from the rack and place it on the back of your shoulders
  • Make sure your feet are even
  • Slowly lower hips while keeping toes pointed forward
  • Push straight into the floor and stand back up nice and tall
  • Repeat for specified reps

B2. Bench Press: 4×6

  • Take barbell from the rack and lower it midway directly over your chest
  • Place your feet on the ground at the base of the bench so you can use your feet to anchor yourself as you push the weight up

B3. Bent Over Row: 4×6

  • With the barbell on the ground, bend over with back straight
  • Pull bar to waist, extend arms out and repeat

C1. Reverse Lunges: 4×6 each side

  • Hold dumbbells in each hand
  • Reach one leg back as far as your body allows
  • Lower into Lunge until both legs are bent at 90 degrees
  • Return leg to original position
  • Repeat for specified reps

C2. Dumbbell Alternating Chest Press: 4×5

  • On a bench or on a physioball, perform alternate chest presses by pushing one dumbbell up in front of the chest and holding
  • Press the other dumbbell up and lower the other
  • Repeat for specified reps

C3. Renegade Row: 4×6 each side

  • Assume push-up position with hands gripping dumbbells and feet spread wider than shoulder width
  • Row one dumbbell at a time up past your body

D1. Prowler Push 10 yards, then sprint 10 yards: 3×20 yards

  • Push a prowler or a sled 10 yards
  • Sprint another 10 yards

D2. Resisted Sprint with Sled: 3×20 yards

  • Attach yourself to a weighted sled
  • Sprint 20 yards

D3. Sled Pulls: 3x10yds

  • Attach a rope to a sled 10 yards away
  • Pull the rope until the sled is right in front of you

DB Workout Two

A1. Snatch: 3×5

B1. Deadlift: 4×6

  • Stand with feet shoulder-width apart
  • Slowly lower your hips with your chest up and pick up the bar
  • Extend your hips forward and stand back up with barbell

B2. Weighted Pull-Ups: 4×6

  • Perform a Pull-Up with a weight belt and weight plate
  • Choose a weight plate that won’t allow you to perform more than 6 reps

B3. Push Press: 4×5

  • Load barbell onto front of shoulders
  • Using legs, dip into quarter squat, drive up and press bar overhead
  • Repeat for specified reps.

C1. Step-Ups: 4×8 each side

  • Holding dumbbell in each hand, step onto a box or bench
  • Slowly step down
  • Explode back up
  • Repeat for specified reps

C2. Dumbbell Shoulder Press: 4×5

  • Press dumbbells overhead
  • Lower until arms are bent at 90 degrees

C3. Upright Row: 4×6

  • Grab a barbell or EZ bar with arms close together
  • Drive elbows up to raise bar to shoulder level

C4. Front and Lateral Raise: 4×6

  • Raise one dumbbell in front and one dumbbell to side
  • Repeat in opposite fashion and continue for specified reps

D1. Rope Slams: 3×50

  • Hold a weighted rope with arms straight
  • Slam rope toward floor for specified reps

D2. Resisted Backpedal into Sprint: 3x20yards

  • Using a resistance strap, backpedal for 10 yards
  • Turn and sprint another 10 yards

D3. Backpedal into Diagonal Sprint: 3x20yards

  • Backpedal for 10 yards
  • Turn and sprint diagonally for 10 yards in each direction
  • To add more intensity and reaction, chase a partner attempting to catch a football

efensive backs have to be sharp and versatile on the field. To enable them to move effectively in any direction, their training needs to address several components—strength, power, speed, speed endurance, reactive ability, flexibility and coordination. Addressing the specific demands of the position and training them in a logical manner will help any athlete willing to put in the necessary work. If your goal is to compete at the next level, your training program must be solid. (See Top 5 Attributes College Coaches Look For In a Defensive Back.)

Below are two sample workout for D-backs. Try them out or add them to your routine to enhance your training. They both emphasize strength, so pick weights that challenge you beyond 5 reps. Complete the workout by performing each of the grouped exercises in circuit fashion (B1, B2, B3) before moving onto the next grouping (C1, C2, C3).

DB Workout One

A1. Power Clean: 3×5

B1. Back Squat: 4×5

  • Take the barbell from the rack and place it on the back of your shoulders
  • Make sure your feet are even
  • Slowly lower hips while keeping toes pointed forward
  • Push straight into the floor and stand back up nice and tall
  • Repeat for specified reps

B2. Bench Press: 4×6

  • Take barbell from the rack and lower it midway directly over your chest
  • Place your feet on the ground at the base of the bench so you can use your feet to anchor yourself as you push the weight up

B3. Bent Over Row: 4×6

  • With the barbell on the ground, bend over with back straight
  • Pull bar to waist, extend arms out and repeat

C1. Reverse Lunges: 4×6 each side

  • Hold dumbbells in each hand
  • Reach one leg back as far as your body allows
  • Lower into Lunge until both legs are bent at 90 degrees
  • Return leg to original position
  • Repeat for specified reps

C2. Dumbbell Alternating Chest Press: 4×5

  • On a bench or on a physioball, perform alternate chest presses by pushing one dumbbell up in front of the chest and holding
  • Press the other dumbbell up and lower the other
  • Repeat for specified reps

C3. Renegade Row: 4×6 each side

  • Assume push-up position with hands gripping dumbbells and feet spread wider than shoulder width
  • Row one dumbbell at a time up past your body

D1. Prowler Push 10 yards, then sprint 10 yards: 3×20 yards

  • Push a prowler or a sled 10 yards
  • Sprint another 10 yards

D2. Resisted Sprint with Sled: 3×20 yards

  • Attach yourself to a weighted sled
  • Sprint 20 yards

D3. Sled Pulls: 3x10yds

  • Attach a rope to a sled 10 yards away
  • Pull the rope until the sled is right in front of you

DB Workout Two

A1. Snatch: 3×5

B1. Deadlift: 4×6

  • Stand with feet shoulder-width apart
  • Slowly lower your hips with your chest up and pick up the bar
  • Extend your hips forward and stand back up with barbell

B2. Weighted Pull-Ups: 4×6

  • Perform a Pull-Up with a weight belt and weight plate
  • Choose a weight plate that won’t allow you to perform more than 6 reps

B3. Push Press: 4×5

  • Load barbell onto front of shoulders
  • Using legs, dip into quarter squat, drive up and press bar overhead
  • Repeat for specified reps.

C1. Step-Ups: 4×8 each side

  • Holding dumbbell in each hand, step onto a box or bench
  • Slowly step down
  • Explode back up
  • Repeat for specified reps

C2. Dumbbell Shoulder Press: 4×5

  • Press dumbbells overhead
  • Lower until arms are bent at 90 degrees

C3. Upright Row: 4×6

  • Grab a barbell or EZ bar with arms close together
  • Drive elbows up to raise bar to shoulder level

C4. Front and Lateral Raise: 4×6

  • Raise one dumbbell in front and one dumbbell to side
  • Repeat in opposite fashion and continue for specified reps

D1. Rope Slams: 3×50

  • Hold a weighted rope with arms straight
  • Slam rope toward floor for specified reps

D2. Resisted Backpedal into Sprint: 3x20yards

  • Using a resistance strap, backpedal for 10 yards
  • Turn and sprint another 10 yards

D3. Backpedal into Diagonal Sprint: 3x20yards

  • Backpedal for 10 yards
  • Turn and sprint diagonally for 10 yards in each direction
  • To add more intensity and reaction, chase a partner attempting to catch a football

Become A Go 2 Receiver with this Workout!

 

Below is a sample wide receiver workout program. It’s organized into four workouts over five days (ideally Monday through Friday) and includes strength, speed, agility and plyometric training.

Day 1

Since you work on max strength, the first day of the week is the most challenging. This wide receiver workout is a total-body program focused on training heavy. It also includes short-distance speed and agility drills to work on first-step quickness, speed, acceleration and route running.

Strength

Speed

  • Stick Drills: 2-3xdrill
  • Falling Starts: 2-3×5 yards
  • 10-Yard Sprints (2-point stance): 3×3-5

Agility

  • Shuffle: 2×5 yards each direction
  • Backpedal: 2×5 yards
  • L-Drill: 3-5xdrill

Day 2

The Day 1 workout primes the nervous system and recruits a large number of muscle fibers. The workout on Day 2 takes advantage of this by performing explosive power exercises. The focus is on speed of movement and technique. Weight workouts are combined with plyometrics to improve your ability to jump up and catch the ball.

Power

Plyometrics

Day 3

Rest

Day 4

The fourth day is designed to increase power and muscle mass. Split and single-leg lifts are included to train each leg individually. The idea here is that when you run, only one leg at a time is in contact with the ground, and you need to be equally strong on both legs. (Learn more about single-leg training.) This is combined with longer sprints to work on maximal speed and box drills to simulate route running.

Strength

Speed

  • Falling Starts: 2-3×5 yards
  • Stride Length Drill: 3-5xdrill
  • 60-Yard Sprints (2-point stance): 3×3

Agility

  • Shuffle: 2×5 yards
  • Backpedal: 2×5 yards
  • Box Drill: 3-5xdrill (break away from opponent)

Day 5

The fifth day continues to develop power and also builds upper-body muscle. The upper-body workout includes three supersets, meaning that two exercises are performed back-to-back without rest.

Also included is a metabolic conditioning workout to improve endurance. This workout should be changed each week to prevent staleness and overtraining. Rotate among sprinting, heavy ropes, suspension training and kettlebell training.

Power and Upper Body

  • Single-Leg Cleans: 3×3-6 each leg
  • Snatch Pulls: 3×3-6 @ 60%
  • Superset 1: Dumbbell Bench Press and Dips: 3×12-15 and 3xmax
  • Superset 2: Pull-Ups and Dumbbell Rows: 3xmax and 3×12-15
  • Seated Military Press: 3×12-15 @ 60-70%
  • Superset 3: Bicep Curls and Triceps Extensions: 3×12-15 each

Conditioning

Perform each exercise for 30 seconds and repeat circuit three times

Playing Varsity For The First Time? Here’s some need 2 knows!

If you’re a football player who feels ready to make the jump to varsity, you better be prepared for a whole new ballgame in every aspect of your life.

The unpaved journey could begin with lifting weights together as a team, followed by functional types of exercises along with dynamic stretching, conditioning and 7on7s.

That’s just the start of the offseason program for Terry Summerfield, the head coach of Barlow (Ore.) High School, who firmly believes you win varsity football games in the offseason, not because of your commitment level during the actual year.

If you’re making the jump to varsity football and you haven’t been taking your preparation seriously–it may already be too late. Summerfield’s program begins at the start of the calendar year.

“So much of that is preparation, and you start in January usually,” Summerfield said. “You’re doing everything you possibly can to get yourself ready; whether you’re lifting, going to team camps or participating in spring football and on in through the summer.”

Being a varsity athlete can be a much bigger commitment of time than middle school, freshmen or junior varsity football. And it’s not only lifting, practicing and games, but there are also responsibilities for players to participate in activities that help a program establish culture.

“It’s quite a commitment, and we ask a lot out of the kids, but that’s a big part of it. Not only are we expecting them to do the physical part of it, but we do a lot of things for team building to bring our kids together.”

Bonding as a group – such as volunteering in the community – is one of the best ways to make connections with the families and fans of your team. When you’re a member of the varsity football team, you’re a more visible member of the community. The expectations are higher. Summerfield believes athletes should be ready to strive to make people’s lives better by giving back to the community.

Summerfield likens varsity football to a sociology class in terms of a way to learn life skills. He believes it’s important for teams to go out into the community and show support for charities, families in need or medical situations.

When it comes to actual on-field work, a few of the biggest differences on the varsity level include:

  • Needing consistent focus
  • Adjusting to the game speed
  • More film study and game preparation
  • Enhanced focus on nutrition and caring for your body

Additionally, displaying leadership is even more important. Players are expected to not only mentor the young athletes, but also show them the way in the weight room, film sessions, classroom and especially the new bright lights.

Even if a player can handle the physical adjustments, the mental and social aspects can be challenging.

“I think it’s a big jump, especially for a young player who is physically capable,” Summerfield said. “Sometimes you get a freshman who turns sophomore, but it’s quite a culture shock.”

Luckily for players beginning varsity, there are systems in place to help with the transition and coaches to have their back during the process.

“We as coaches are creatures of habit, we plan for everything. We are planning for first down, second down and third down, [etc.], and we should be planning on getting our kids ready for those emotional aspects of the game – both physically and mentally too.”

For those of you who have the eye on the varsity prize, be ready to make the jump to a whole different level, on the field and off.

The (Recruiting) Process!

Get Recruited to Play College Sports

The recruiting process is very different depending on your sport and what division level you are being recruited at. The amount of money spent on recruiting by each sports team is not regulated like it is with scholarships. This means your big sports like football spend hundreds of thousands of dollars every year and other programs are left with sometimes only a couple thousand dollars a year for recruiting.

What can you do if the coach has a big recruiting budget?

If you are looking to play for one of the major college sports teams the recruiting process for these coaches is very different then smaller programs. If you aren’t hearing from these schools by your sophomore year you will need to take the initiative yourself. These programs have teams of people around the country finding athletes who can play at the top college levels.

Additionally, these coaches have certain expectations of the athletes they recruit. They will spend several hours evaluating each athlete over the course over a couple years. You need to be attending their camps, sending in video and finding other ways to play in front of these coaches. They don’t have time for athletes who appear disinterested.

What if the school you want to go to has a small recruiting budget?

The vast majority of scholarship opportunities come from programs that don’t have the money to go out and find their athletes. These programs rely on interested and qualified athletes to seek them out and make the effort to be evaluated by their staff. This means you will need to proactively contact schools, put together a resume and video and introduce yourself to coaches.

The expectations on the athlete are the same as larger programs. These coaches still need to evaluate you, you will need to attend their camps or showcases and visiting the school is always a good idea. Sometimes coaches can help out finically with visits or camps but typically an athlete will need to share some of the expense.

The only recruiting rule that matters.

While there are hundreds or complex recruiting rules there is only one that really matters and it’s not even really a rule. As a prospective student athlete you can call or email a coach anytime you want and the coaches can speak with you. As long as you are initiating the contact coaches can speak with you. But they are prohibited in initiating the contact with recruits. Rule savvy athletes have been using this little known fact for decades to get scholarships ahead of equally deserving recruits.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL SCHOLARSHIPS

FOOTBALL RECRUITING AND SCOUTING INFORMATION.. Why not go the Juco route?

Plenty of high school football players are very good. Just because they were the best or among the best in their schools does not mean that college coaches will be offering up full ride football scholarships. Only those in the top 1% of players in their area can hope to hear the phone ring with the voice of a college coach on the other end without having to do a lot of the work in the football recruiting process on their own.

Many players choose to start their college football careers at the junior college level. There are several benefits to starting your career at the JUCO College level.

If you want to be recruited as a junior college football player you have to make it happen for yourself. Many JUCO colleges just do not have the budget necessary to mount serious recruiting campaigns, hire recruiters or offer scholarships to promising students. Contact coaches directly to talk about recruitment. Don’t give up completely on getting a community college football scholarship, teams that compete at the NJCAA permit up to 85 football scholarships.

Some junior college programs have plenty of funds while others barely have enough to operate. It can be challenging to get playing time at junior colleges, though, just as it can be in four-year colleges.

Academically, community colleges often offer a better learning environment than some four-year colleges. Their faculty members are just as experienced and educated as four-year college professors. With smaller class sizes, however, these teachers are able to devote some more of their time to responding to their students’ individual needs. Students often report that they feel some of the best educational opportunities begin at the community college level and that they really matter to their teachers. Smaller class sizes also encourage students to get to know one another and to build strong relationships with their peers.

This sort of environment can be just what some athletes need to thrive academically. To build the academic reputation necessary to be recruited by a four-year college coach down the road, many student athletes find junior college to the best answer.

When you’re researching junior colleges, look for ones that will offer you the most playing time. The more playing time you get the better chance you will be recruited at the NCAA level. Scouts can see you in action, and you will have the best opportunity to improve your game in your first two years of college so that you are ready to compete for football scholarships at the NCAA level before your junior year of college. Moving on to the NCAA level is not impossible once you play at the NJCAA level.

Don’t completely discount getting a football scholarship from a four-year institution after playing at the junior college level. If going to a junior college helps you get a good GPA during your first two years of college after a not-so-stellar high school academic career, enroll in one. You will save a significant amount of money in your first two years of college, possibly avoiding student loans altogether. Community colleges offer scholarships for a variety of talents. A good GPA can help you earn them and to pay your first two years of tuition easily.

Focus on finding the right people at a four year university to recruit you during your freshman and sophomore years. Get as much playing time as possible, and strive to do your best in every practice and game. Keep your grades up and your eyes on your goal, and you can play at the NCAA or NAIA level when the time is right on the perfect scholarship for you.

MaxPreps launches new mobile app for high school sports teams Free app simplifies team management and offers secure communication between coaches, parents and student-athletes.

CAMERON PARK, Calif. – MaxPreps, the leader in high school sports and a CBS Sports Digital site, launched a brand new mobile app today, Teams by MaxPreps. Designed specifically for high school coaches, the Teams app improves the high school sports experience by connecting staff, parents and student-athletes in a private community. Available for both iOS and Android, this free app is the newest addition to a suite of services that MaxPreps provides to high school sports communities throughout the country.

A key feature of the Teams app is individual privacy protection. With a focus on inter-team communications, the Teams app will ensure secure in-app communication without the need to share any personal contact information such as phone numbers and email addresses. Earning high praise from administrators, the Teams app provides an extra layer of protection to all users.

Another special communication feature will prevent users from getting overwhelmed with messages. Specific topics can be managed in unique conversations, so arranging a carpool for the upcoming tournament doesn’t get mixed in with sharing position-specific practice times or ordering t-shirts. All communication will automatically include read receipts, giving the coach or team communicator the peace of mind that their message has been seen and received.

Beyond the team communication benefits, the Teams app reduces the stress on coaches by allowing them to manage permissions within their team community. App users can now be given specific access to update sports information and/or manage team communication. For example, coaches can allow a parent to manage communication without editing player stats.

“MaxPreps thrives due to the commitment of high school coaches to share their team’s sports information,” MaxPreps founder and president Andy Beal said. “We owe it to coaches to provide them with the tools they need to make them more efficient and give them more time to do what they really love – coach their teams.”

Teams by MaxPreps includes the following features:
• 100 percent free
• Privacy protection with no personal phone or email sharing
• Direct and group messaging, including read receipts
• App notifications for team updates
• Permission-based access
• Calendar syncing to mobile phones
• Roster and schedule management
• Score and stat entry tools

Coaches that already use MP Coach, MaxPreps’ existing coach-only mobile app, will be upgraded the next time they update their app. New coaches can download the Teams app from iTunes and Google Play stores.

For more information about the Teams app, please visit: MaxPreps.com/Teams

Midwest Region Top 20

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No. 1 Ben Davis (Indiana) 14-0

No. 2 Prairie Ridge (Illinois) 14-0

No. 3 Lincoln-Way East (Illinois) 14-0

No. 4 Phillips Academy (Illinois) 14-0

No. 5 Maine South (Illinois) 12-2

No. 6 Loyola Academy (Illinois) 12-2

No. 7 Carmel (Indiana) 8-5

No. 8 Lawrence Central (Indiana) 6-4

No. 9 Warren Central (Indiana) 7-4

No. 10 Center Grove (Indiana) 6-6

No. 11 Kimberly (Wisconsin) 14-0

No. 12 De La Salle Collegiate (Michigan) 12-2

No. 13 Muskegon (Michigan) 14-0

No. 14 East St.Louis  (Illinois)

No. 15 Eden Prairie (Minnesota) 13-0

No. 16 Clarkston (Michigan) 12-2

No. 17 Batavia (Illinois) 12-1

No. 18 Detroit MLK (Michigan) 11-2

No. 19 West Bloomfield (Michigan) 11-3

No. 20 Cass Tech (Michigan) 9-3

America’s Next Premier HS All American Game to Feature European Players

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The Phenom Elite High School All-America Game is a high school football all-star game to be held in early January 2019 created to spotlight each nation’s TOP high school Sr’s & Jr’s. After talking with numerous athletes around the world that wasn’t getting exposer or was being over looked by coaches as well as other Postseason Showcase Games. ISN has partnered with America’s Hottest Athletic Brand Phenom Elite to bring you America’s Next Premier High School All American Game. College coaches will have the rare opportunity to evaluate European athletes during live game situations, American players have the opportunity of mixing with cultures from different parts of the world, American Military (DODDS) athletes have the chance to compete on American soil against Top American talent and boost their recruitment! There’s No other opportunity like this offered in the world. The game is sponsored by Phenom Elite and enjoys a national audience thanks to a STL broadcast partner to be announced. The game is co-owned by PE. Players C/O 2019 & 2020 that’s interested in being evaluated for this All American game 📥 us!

ASAP! #ISNrecruit #PhenomElite #BeElite #EarnYourStars #HSFB #Americanfootball

ISN Top Prospect Salieu Ceesay Drawing Big Time Attention! #TrustTheISNProcess 

It’s been over a year now since German quarterback Salieu Ceesay contacted ISN & Coach Jonas about their student placement service and helping him achieve a dream of playing high school football in America. Coach Jonas followed his normal routine as he does for all ISN clients, he asked Salieu to send in his football bio!. Coach evaluated the film of the young QB and fell in love with his athletic ability. This young man was classified as someone special and coach Jonas accepted him in to the #ISNFamily and got to work. After being ranked and rated by ISN as a 4⭐️ QB many American coaches took notice. After talking with a few different schools coach Jonas found the perfect match for Salieu. A safe family atmosphere is something he was looking for and we found that in Aquinas and their staff.  After gathering all the information Salieu would need to attend school in America we started the process. Many think the process is simple and easy but their wrong, it’s much more to it and you must have the mind for such a process. Salieu helped Aquinas this year as a junior at many positions like QB 64-111 1146PY 16TD 2INT,WR, and DB 13tackles and 2INTs and went to the Semifinals with a 11-3 overall record and 4-1 in conference play in his first American season! Salieu also pulled in league achievements on top of becoming a big time D1 prospect, gaining interest from colleges like USC, Fresno St, Utah St,and USF to name a few. He’s spending his offseason working with Steve Calhoun of Armed and Dangerous which is seen as one of America’s best QB instructors. Salieu will draw lots of more attention from big time colleges heading into next season. He’s also drawing tons of attention from all types of different outlets looking to possibly cash in on his success. Salieu has been and will remain apart of the ISN family Coach Jonas stated!